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Free Sherlock - verdict

So  it would appear that the Free Sherlock campaign is celebrating victory over the Conan Doyle Estate. But what difference does it really make? 

Saved by the Speckled Band

Hurrah. I've finally got a substantial article into the main Sherlock Holmes Journal.


Would Victorian "Sherlock" have been as popular?

Now here’s a question. Would Sherlock have been as popular as it has been if it had been set in the Victorian era? In other words, to what extent is its popularity driven by the fact that it is contemporary?

Wow. That all got a bit mad didn't it?

The fallout of Morangate continued today with a robust exchange on Twitter....

Sherlock at the BFI aka Morangate

Well it would appear that Caitlin Moran messed up rather astoundingly at the BFI screening of The Empty Hearse.

Compliments of the season

As is my custom, I extend to you all the compliments of the season.

How do we see Sherlock Holmes?

In response to my request that you suggest a topic, I was asked this on Twitter by @shelly_murav

@alistaird221b do u feel there is a major difference in how Americans view Sherlock Holmes compared to say the British?

Sherlock Holmes post 1903 - the Bee-keeping Years

The subject of Sherlock Holmes’s retirement is one as open to speculation as the great hiatus. In fact, you could argue, they are much the same. They are periods when Holmes’s movements are largely unknown.


An invitation: suggest a topic

Right I may regret this but I have decided to invite you, my readers, to suggest topics for me to cover on this blog.

A great film with Doylean and Sherlockian links.

When it comes to certain stories or films, my taste can be seen as more than a little soppy/romantic in the sense that I do like romances set against a backdrop of turbulent times. One of my favourite films is the 1950s version of The Prisoner of Zenda starring Stewart Granger and Deborah Kerr. That film was based on the book of the same name by Anthony Hope – a friend of Arthur Conan Doyle who visited him at Undershaw.

UPDATED: Buy something Sherlockian - It's Cyber-Monday

Today is Cyber-Monday so why not get out there and buy one (or all) of my books....

Update - Access to purchasing links added.

Review: First Books of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle – edited by Stephan Arthur of The Poor Folk Upon the Moors

This booklet, which is a limited edition priced at £6 (includes postage), looks at the young Arthur’s early attempts at writing beginning with a scrap from a story written about a Tiger when he was at school. 

So my prediction was out then...

A short while ago I made my prediction for when Sherlock series three would air in the UK. It would seem I was a little out.

Missing Sherlock? You're so lucky

Are you one of the legion of people who are missing Sherlock and longing for its return. Well, as my parents occasionally said, you don't know you're born. Spare a thought for the Victorians.

Sherlock Holmes R.I.P. ?

Is Sherlock Holmes, by which I mean the written Holmes, on the decline? Yes it may seem a silly question but, if the internet can be taken as indicative, the answer must be yes.

Is it possible to legitimately criticise Sherlock or Elementary?

As I have remarked before, Sherlock and Elementary find themselves compared against each other all the time. The problem I feel now is that legitimate and objective criticism of either series is virtually impossible thanks to the, frankly, tribal followings that the shows “enjoy”.

Doylean Giants: Hesketh Pearson

I thought I would write a brief post about a man whom I admire greatly and do so on the strength of one book. His name is Hesketh Pearson.

Society Plug - The Poor Folk Upon the Moors

Regular followers of this blog will recall that I recently had an article published in two journals. The article in question was entitled The Hound of the Daffodils.

So what do we think about colouring Rathbone?

Basil Rathbone was responsible for my first experience of Sherlock Holmes. Consequently, even though I don't consider him my favourite Holmes, I have a special fondness for his films and his portrayal.

Adaptations can only hurt themselves

One of the arguments occasionally bandied about is that Sherlock Holmes pastiches, fan fiction, screen adaptations etc. can, if not done well, damage Sherlock Holmes as a character. I believe an argument on these lines has been put forward by the Conan Doyle estate in its battle over copyright in the US.

Arthur Conan Doyle - A Study in Accuracy

When it comes to biographical accounts of the life of Arthur Conan Doyle there has always been a problem with accuracy.

Sherlock and Watson eh?

What is it with the names of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson?

Sherlock at the BFI - my thoughts

I must admit to being decidedly irritated by the whole business of the première of Sherlock series three being at the BFI in December.

Arthur Conan Doyle and women

For advocates of sexual equality Arthur Conan Doyle can be seen as both a hero and villain.

Should things that are “off the page” stay that way?

In the Sherlock Holmes stories there are things that are alluded to and events that are described after they have taken place. Should people who are adapting the stories for the screen leave them that way or is it good for them to use such things as a pass to indulge themselves?

Happy Birthday (almost) Jeremy Brett

This Sunday (November 3rd) sees the birthday of the late, great Jeremy Brett. Born in 1933 he would have been eighty years old. Alas, he died in 1995 at the age of 61.

Undershaw Watch

My wife and I spent a couple of hours in Grayshott today at the wonderful Fox & Pelican pub.

Talkin' 'bout my generation

What are you on Alistair? I hear you cry. What's with the lyrics? Well it seemed an appropriate introduction to a theory first put forward in a BBC documentary.

Undershaw: A brief video

Yes Undershaw again. I just thought I'd share the video about this vulnerable piece of our heritage narrated by UPT founder John Gibson.

Guest posts

Well I've now hosted two guest posts on my blog and they have proved popular (in terms of hits) and have generated comments and even debate.

Undershaw: A good development?

It would seem that my post on Undershaw yesterday was well timed. Today I picked up a copy of the latest Haslemere Herald and it contained a piece of encouraging news.

Undershaw - the saga continues

I have waxed lyrical about Undershaw on numerous occasions and, as regular readers will know, I have played a small part in the efforts to see it preserved. However, I have been growing a little concerned at the questions being asked by fellow supporters as to what is going on in the campaign to save it.

Guest Post: The Many Faces of Irene

I am relatively new to the world of Sherlock Holmes and until I read “A Scandal in Bohemia”, I really didn't like the character of Irene Adler. After reading “A Scandal in Bohemia” I realize that my aversion to the character of Irene was simply because I had never before seen the original. 

ANOTHER UPDATE South Norwood Tourist Board - Lake naming

The South Norwood Tourist Board is continuing its campaign to have a lake named after Arthur Conan Doyle in South Norwood Country Park (see here).

I need to write something....

As some of you will know, I am the author of four books and several articles in the Sherlockian/Doylean field. However, this blog aside, I've been resting on my laurels somewhat of late.

Guest Post: The Island of Uffa

“The Five Orange Pips” gives some of those tantalizing untold tales that Watson loved to tease his readers with: “the adventure of the Paradol Chamber, of the Amateur Mendicant Society, who held a luxurious club in the lower vault of a furniture warehouse, of the facts connected with the loss of the British barque Sophy Anderson, of the singular adventures of the Grice Patersons in the island of Uffa, and finally of the Camberwell poisoning case.” The location of the island of Uffa has long puzzled Sherlockian scholars because it exists in no atlas. They were looking in the wrong place. They needed to check Temple Bar.  

Guest bloggers

Following my good old moan about the lack of response to my request for guest submissions, I now have the possibility of two.

Unsympathetic “victims”

As devotees will know,  Sherlock Holmes was more than ready to be his own judge and jury when it suited him. When he chooses to act in this capacity we are encouraged to accept that he is right and that he is helping good people by doing so.


Langdale Pike - Two characters blended together?

The Adventure of the Three-Gables seems to me to be an adventure that tends to come in for criticism. This either concerns the plot or the depiction of the boxer Steve Dixie. I won’t dwell on the latter as plenty of people have trampled that particular piece of ground and the poor opinion that some people have of the plot is, I think, unfair. 

I shall struggle on

Not that long ago I put out a request for blog submissions. Much to my disappointment I only got one tentative reply.

I must be quite mad

I've been "enjoying" a few days leave from work (paid - fortunately). I say "enjoying" because there has not been much R'n'R. Instead I've been building bookshelves, mounting pictures, scrubbing mud off walls and other domestic chores. Some of these chores (such as bookshelf construction) are rare, others less so.

Book preservation

Following on from my blog post on what to collect (see here) I thought I would move on to look at book preservation - albeit in an amateur way.

Latest addition to the collection and the "science" behind it

I feel that, if you are a collector of all things Sherlock Holmes (or of Victoriana in general), there are some things that you should have. I generally confine my collecting to printed material but there are a few objects that I simply had to have.

Has Twitter matured?

Not all that long ago I used Scoop.it to circulate an article that looked at the reasons why some people love Mr Cumberbatch and some reasons why they don't. I didn't write it myself and I did not favour one side over the other. Yet for the simple act of circulating it I came in for some insults on Twitter. One person, by way of retaliation for my obvious insult to her idol, said that I had the most pathetic Sherlockian blog on the internet (or sentiments to that effect).

The Free Sherlock campaign

I don’t need to explain what this is. Most people will already have a pretty good idea and those who don’t can visit the website for details. I have no intention of going deeply into the arguments being voiced by both sides. There are plenty of others out there doing that already.

Experimenting with a new detective?

In 1898 two detective stories were published by Arthur Conan Doyle. Both revolved around train-related crimes and both involved an unnamed detective who was less than successful. They were entitled The Lost Special and The Man with the Watches.

False Alarm

I regret to report that my idea for a new book is no more. A few weeks back I had an idea that I thought I could flesh out into a reasonable tome but, alas, I no longer feel that way and the project will be going no further.

Hi-de-Hi readers

Lynn Gale, of the Undershaw Preservation Trust, has sent me a photo of sitcom legend Ruth Madoc with a copy of my book An Entirely New Country and Sherlock's Home.

Video of Granada props in London

This video of the Granada Holmes props now on display in London was shot by @wirralbagpuss and deserves a bigger audience.

Cumberbatch must be stopped

I admit to being firmly on the road to becoming a fuddy-duddy (I hope that means the same in all countries) so, given that I have a lot of teens to 20-somethings on my Twitter, a great amount of what I read is littered with terms I really don’t grasp.

What do I collect?

A lot of Sherlockians, when they decide to embark upon serious collecting, are a bit confused as to where to start - I certainly was.

Initial thoughts/review of Conan Doyle –Writing, Profession, and Practice by Douglas Kerr

It is important that you note that this is a limited review based on the quarter or so of the book I have read up to the point of writing. It may seem unfair to judge a book based only on a percentage of its content but the comments I will be making will be confined to what I have read and are subject to change as I progress through the book.

Conan Doyle, boxing and a case of very bad timing

Arthur Conan Doyle was a fan of boxing. It was arguably his favourite sport and his love of it was well known.  If anyone had been in doubt as to his interest those doubts would have been quelled with the publication of his book Rodney Stone in 1896. This book revolved around the bare-knuckle boxing that took place during the British regency period.

Four ages of Conan Doyle

I just thought I'd put out a little post of Arthur Conan Doyle at four different ages.

Downey Jr’s Sherlock Holmes – Surplus to requirements?

I read only recently that the preparatory stages are underway for a third Sherlock Holmes film from Warner Brothers but that, allegedly, it will only proceed if Robert Downey Jr likes the script.

South Norwood Tourist Board - A wee mistake

I decided to have a glance at the website of the South Norwood Tourist Board and was a little concerned at their latest post.

Book Review: Conan Doyle and the Crimes Club by Stephen Wade

Well, to begin with a cliché, they say you should never judge a book by its cover and this has never been so true as it is with this book. It is one of those cases where the subtitle of the book is more accurate than the title.

Undershaw post - follow up

I'll be the first to admit that I'm not as up-to-date on all matters Undershaw as perhaps I should be. However, I've been doing a little reading and I am quite frankly staggered at the present situation.

Undershaw and Grayshott

Yesterday I took a wander up to Hindhead and Grayshott. The main aim was to have a look at Undershaw and see what state it was in.

A Study in Syllables

In a variety of contexts we all will have heard the expression “what’s in a name?”. As it turns out, I suspect that there is rather a lot in a name.

Jeremy Brett and Edward Hardwicke interview

An interview with Messrs Brett and Hardwicke from approx 1989* where they talk about the Granada series and their two-man Sherlock Holmes play.

May 4 1891


Remember the original fall

A 3 or 4 or 5 pipe problem?

When you think of the classic image of Sherlock Holmes (the Victorian one) the two items that leap to mind are the deerstalker hat and curved pipe.

Baron Gruner – The villain I want to see

It was recently revealed that BBC’s Sherlock was going to dust down Charles Augustus Milverton (albeit a slightly renamed version) to be Sherlock’s nemesis in series three. This was widely expected and hoped for and while I am not unhappy about this I would have preferred to see Baron Gruner make an appearance.

The original Reichenbach Fall

With a new series of Sherlock not too far away we know we will soon be learning how Sherlock survived.

BBC Sherlock - Ignorance is bliss

I was ten when the Granada Sherlock Holmes series began in 1984 and I don’t recall being outraged or emotionally damaged when Holmes went over the falls (supposedly) at the end of The Final Problem. In this I find myself at the opposite pole to many younger fans of BBC Sherlock who seemed to go into a collective bout of hysteria at the conclusion of The Reichenbach Fall (if many blogs and Youtube videos are anything to go by).

Two more items in the library

I'm not sure it's a saying but, if it isn't, it deserves to be - if you have space you'll attempt to fill it. When I was renting a flat I had a distinct lack of room and this curtailed my collecting of Sherlockiana (well I see it as curtailed, I suspect my wife would disagree).

Le Figaro - again!

I had more or less forgotten about this but a few weeks ago I was approached once more by Le Figaro for my thoughts on the Murder Rooms series with the late Ian Richardson. I gave a relatively concise response and thought little more about it.

Mycroft – The unwanted Holmes

Mycroft Holmes is an incredibly popular character from the Sherlock Holmes universe and it is not unreasonable to say that, of late, this is almost entirely down to his depiction by Mark Gatiss in Sherlock. In no other dramatization I can think of has Mycroft Holmes enjoyed such a presence (not even Granada's). Most screen adaptations have tended to mirror the canon and have Mycroft as little more than a character making the occasional fleeting appearance.

Twitter abuse aimed at Mark Gatiss

I don't check my Tumblr as often as I should. To be honest I use it mostly as a channel for links to this blog. However, I have just logged into my dashboard for the first time in weeks to find this link from one of my new followers:

What is the future of the new Russian Sherlock?

Well Wikipedia (if it can be trusted) states that the actor who plays Watson in the new Russian Sherlock series died at the beginning of the year.

Hello Latvia

Warm greetings to the people of Latvia. You seem to have developed a real interest in my blog of late (or perhaps one person REALLY loves it).

Nevertheless - welcome.

Amusing use of Sherlock in advertising


Sherlock Holmes has been used to advertise a lot of products but this is a good one - in the sense that it is funny.

The Priory School – semi-autobiographical?

I dare say that others noticed this long ago but I have just begun to appreciate the strong autobiographical elements in The Priory School.

Money Vs Longevity - A brief follow up

I posted a link to my earlier blog post (this one) on Facebook and there was a comment stating that surely people also wrote because of a love of the character etc.

Moves to name a lake after Arthur Conan Doyle

The South Norwood Tourist Board are making efforts to get the lake in South Norwood Country Park named "Lake Conan" in honour of Arthur Conan Doyle.

Sherlockian fiction V non-fiction – money or longevity?

There has always been a constant supply of new books in the Sherlockian field. In the years post-Granada and pre-Downey Jr/Cumberbatch this supply was best described as a trickle. Now it is a fast flowing stream or perhaps even river.

Latest eBay piece of fun

Well here is my latest quirky item found in the pages of eBay. Perfect for the crime fiction obsessive who needs to carry an ID card.

Black Armbands - more elusive than the Holy Grail?

I quick look at Twitter reveals that the subject of the Sherlock Holmes mourning bands has arisen once more. To be specific, it is the lack of any progress in finding evidence that has arisen (if something intangible can arise).

An ACD/Sherlock festival in Haslemere? Ideas please.

An exchange with contacts I made at the Haslemere Festival in 2012 revealed that there were no plans to repeat the ACD/Sherlock angle at future Festivals. I think this is a crying shame and am looking for ideas for a Sherlock/ACD celebration that could be held informally.

Weird Sherlock items on eBay

A few years ago I went through a phase of putting up details of out of the common Sherlockian items that could be found for sale. As I have nothing better to post just now I thought I'd offer this little gem.

How many more times?

Would you believe that a certain company (who shall remain nameless) persist in trying to get me to take up the offer of a money off  voucher if I permit them to sponsor a post on my blog. I don't know how much clearer I can make my non-commercial stance.


An old favourite

I have a good sized Sherlockian/Doylean collection and there is nothing like a house move to make you go through it all and rediscover items that you'd almost forgotten that you had. In this particular instance I have been rereading the 1941 biography of Conan Doyle written by Hesketh Pearson.

A three-pipe problem

Sorry for the recent quiet spell. I have been in the process of moving house and there has been much to do. Normal service will resume when the dust settles.


Le Figaro - Pre-translated/edited questions and answers

On Wednesday July 3rd an article was published in Le Figaro in which I was one of the "experts" interviewed about Sherlock and its impact. I was asked a lot more than was ultimately published so I obtained permission from the journalist to post my original answers to her questions here.


Le Figaro - interview about BBC Sherlock

Constance Jamet of French newspaper Le Figaro has recently interviewed me about BBC Sherlock and Sherlock Holmes in general. The interview (in French obviously) will be in the Wednesday issue of the newspaper. Exactly how much of what I said makes it in depends on the allocated space in the issue.

Article soon to be published

It won't be long before my article "The Changing Face of the Sherlockian" is published in the next (Summer) issue of The Baker Street Journal. It will be my début in this respected publication.

Pastiche or not pastiche?

It is pretty safe to say that we have seen an explosion in the production of Sherlock Holmes stories in recent years. The problem is that they are collectively referred to as pastiche stories when many (most?) are nothing of the kind.

Great Sherlock Holmes debate IV - Warner Bros

I see from the MX Publishing tumblr that the argument in favour of Warner Bros' depiction of Sherlock Holmes has been posted.

Britain's Secret Homes

The series Britain's Secret Homes began last week and one of the many buildings featured was Stonyhurst - the Jesuit boarding school attended by Arthur Conan Doyle. The segment was presented by Anthony Horowitz.

Who can be replaced?

It has been reported that both Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat have stated that they would not continue to make Sherlock if they lost the services of either Benedict Cumberbatch or Martin Freeman. Is this an artistic decision or a commercial one?

We profit by his mistakes

The world of traditional Sherlockian scholarship essentially exists because of two things. Firstly the "game" whereby the stories are regarded as factual accounts and, secondly, the mistakes in those accounts.

A Study in Desperation...?

Following on from my post re saturation I have been giving some thought as to why people, when creating their own pastiche works, sometimes go out of their way to change the formula. You only have to look at the Canon itself to see that this is (usually) a bad idea.

Weekend viewing....perhaps

I'm not doing anything too energetic this weekend. I need comfort telly. To my mind that means three basic ingredients. Rich Tea biscuits, a pot of coffee and....


Blog post comments - the situation

In light of some recent exchanges, and in the interests of this blog's readers, I'm going to re-state the latest position on comments.

Small technical update.

You can now use the left and right arrow keys to go back and forth through the posts on this blog.

Undershaw - another anniversary

It's one year to the day that the planning permission that would have seen Undershaw carved up into separate dwellings was quashed.

Sherlock Holmes and drugs

Readers of the Canon (and people who have watched some screen adaptations) will be familiar with Sherlock Holmes and drugs. However, only those who have read the Canon will be aware of the true position which is that Sherlock Holmes only ever turned to drugs when bored. Many adaptations have ignored this golden rule for reasons best known to their screenwriters.

Unseen footage - Langham Hotel Plaque unveiling March 19 2010

I was one of many members of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London who attended the plaque unveiling at the Langham Hotel on March 19th 2010. This short video, taken by me and not published before, shows Gyles Brandreth attempting to make his way to where the plaque was cited in order to unveil it.

Reichenbach - why Reichenbach?

Why did Arthur Conan Doyle choose the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland for Sherlock Holmes’s fateful clash with Professor Moriarty? Was it purely as a result of his personal visit there or were there other reasons?

Sherlockian saturation?


Some people would argue that it has never been a better time to be a Sherlockian. Two successful TV series (three when the Russian series starts) and a successful film franchise have led to a tidal wave of fan inspired blogs, fiction, Twitter, Tumblr and so on. Away from the internet there has been a surge in the production of Holmes pastiche works - be they books or plays.

Bank Holiday Viewing

Christopher Plummer's Holmes, despite being a little too emotional at times, is underrated. In his honour I shall be watching this today.





Defend ACD - Who decides literary importance?


Arthur Conan Doyle must be the most popular under-appreciated author of recent times. During many of the discussions about Undershaw and why the home of such a famous writer should not be accorded the same level of reverence as that shown for the houses of Dickens and Austen it was suggested that Conan Doyle was simply not in the same class.

It's Undershaw Day

Today marks one year since the case regarding Undershaw was heard at the high court. As you all know this subsequently resulted in the planning permission for Undershaw being quashed.

Why is Sherlock Holmes English?


I think it is generally accepted that Sherlock Holmes is English with some French ancestry. In The Adventure of the Greek Interpreter we learn that….

Weak men in the Canon

At the risk of being seen as turning on my own gender, let's have a look at weak male characters in the Sherlock Holmes Canon.

Happy birthday ACD



Subcutaneously my dear Watson

This is a book in serious need of a reprinting..

Plaque at Tennison Road - word from English Heritage

To recap on earlier posts...

Recently I reported that 12 Tennison Road had been sold. At the request of other Sherlockians, I approached English Heritage to alert them to the potential risk to the plaque that any redevelopment of the site might cause.

Has Sherlock stifled Sherlockian TV output?


I've never made a secret of the fact that I prefer a Victorian Holmes. Don’t get me wrong, I love Sherlock but I do feel that all the time it is on (and probably for some time after it finishes) we won’t see a Victorian Sherlock series on our screens (well not a new one).

English Heritage and 12 Tennison Road



I contacted English Heritage to make them aware of the situation with 12 Tennison Road.

Wracking my brains

I have, in the last few minutes, completed my draft report on the SHSL boat trip down the Thames which took place on Saturday May 18th.

Strong women in the Canon.


The Canon is blessed with, in my opinion, many notable female characters. Conan Doyle does not give us many shrinking Violets although he does give us three strong Violets.

SHSL AGM 2013


Last night saw the Annual General Meeting of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London at the National Liberal Club on London’s Embankment.

Tonight's destination


The scene of tonight's Sherlockian business is the National Liberal Club on London's Embankment.

12 Tennison Road is Sold


Arthur Conan Doyle's South Norwood Home at 12 Tennison Road has been sold for an undisclosed sum.

Sherlock Holmes Society of London - AGM May 16th

Tomorrow sees the Annual General Meeting of The Sherlock Holmes Society of London at the National Liberal Club in central London. Open to full members and their guests only its purpose is to report on the previous year's activities and outline the vision for the next twelve months.

Elementary rudeness


I was skimming through recent updates on Facebook yesterday evening when I came across a very unpleasant remark made by a lady to the effect that anyone who didn't like Elementary was a “snob” and had their head up their bottom (not the word she chose).

James Mortimer FRCS - Was Watson really wrong?


I think it safely goes without saying that one of the most often miscast Sherlockian characters is James Mortimer FRCS. Erroneously referred to as Dr Mortimer, this is the man who brings the legend of The Hound of the Baskervilles to Sherlock Holmes’s attention.

No Place As Holmes?


Like many of you reading this post, I have seen a great many actors don the deerstalker (not necessarily literally) to play Sherlock Holmes. Some are good, some indifferent and some awful.

However, when it comes to the poorer ones, what’s worse – one that is just nowhere near or one that is tantalizingly close but mucks it up with something silly? I would venture to suggest the latter.

London in 1927 in colour

Amazing colour footage of London in 1927. This was the same year that the last Sherlock Holmes stories were published. A colour glimpse into Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's world. Three years later he would be dead.

Article publication date - *almost* confirmed

I am pleased to announce that it is highly likely that my article on The Hound of the Baskervilles will be published towards the end of the year in two journals.

How easy is it to get a Sherlockian article published in a journal?


Some Sherlockians out there will, at some point, try their hand at an article destined for one of the many society journals. So how likely are you to be successful?

Fallen Holmes & black armbands


I noted with some interest a letter (written by Peter Calamai) in the back of the current Baker Street Journal in regards to the notion that members of the public wore black armbands in their mourning for Sherlock Holmes in 1893.
  

Three words...three hints

In the spirit of Sherlock I thought I'd put together a three word list to indicate the subjects of my next three articles. The order of publication may vary from this though. I should clarify that these will be articles in Sherlockian journals (fingers crossed) rather than on this blog.

The words are:

Fan Snake Daffodil



For more information on Arthur Conan Doyle and his time at Undershaw please refer to my book, An Entirely New Country which is available through all good bookstores including Amazon USA, Amazon UK, Classic Specialities, and in all electronic formats including iTunes, Kobo, Nook and Kindle .

The Norwood Author is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Waterstones UK, Amazon UK,  Amazon USA, Barnes and Noble, Amazon Kindle, iBooks for the iPad/iPhone, Kobo Books, Nook.

Close to Holmes is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Amazon USABarnes and NobleAmazon UKWaterstones UKAmazon KindleKoboNook  and iBooks for the iPad/iPhone.

Eliminate the Impossible is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Amazon USA, Barnes and Noble, Amazon UK, Waterstones UK, Amazon Kindle, Kobo, Nook and iBooks for the iPad/iPhone.

221B Con via @BakerStBabes



A feel of the recent 221BCon courtesy of the Baker Street Babes.

For more information on Arthur Conan Doyle and his time at Undershaw please refer to my book, An Entirely New Country which is available through all good bookstores including Amazon USA, Amazon UK, Classic Specialities, and in all electronic formats including iTunes, Kobo, Nook and Kindle .

The Norwood Author is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Waterstones UK, Amazon UK,  Amazon USA, Barnes and Noble, Amazon Kindle, iBooks for the iPad/iPhone, Kobo Books, Nook.

Close to Holmes is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Amazon USABarnes and NobleAmazon UKWaterstones UKAmazon KindleKoboNook  and iBooks for the iPad/iPhone.

Eliminate the Impossible is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Amazon USA, Barnes and Noble, Amazon UK, Waterstones UK, Amazon Kindle, Kobo, Nook and iBooks for the iPad/iPhone.

Review - Benedict Cumberbatch, In Transition: An Unauthorised Performance Biography by Lynnette Porter


Please note that this review is based on a preview copy of the book and aspects of it may have changed by the time it becomes available.

Release date: June 10th 2013

I was recently supplied with a preview copy of the “Performance biography” of Benedict Cumberbatch and asked for my thoughts on it. The problem is that it is a difficult thing for me to review.

Last night's SHSL Council Meeting


Last night saw the Council meeting of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London. This is arguably the most important one of the year as it is the one that comes immediately before the AGM and hence before membership of the Council ends for some members.

Scribbling away...

I have begun work on a new article. I don't know where, if anywhere, it'll end up but I'll worry about that later. It will be based on The Hound of the Baskervilles.



For more information on Arthur Conan Doyle and his time at Undershaw please refer to my book, An Entirely New Country which is available through all good bookstores including Amazon USA, Amazon UK, Classic Specialities, and in all electronic formats including iTunes, Kobo, Nook and Kindle .

The Norwood Author is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Waterstones UK, Amazon UK,  Amazon USA, Barnes and Noble, Amazon Kindle, iBooks for the iPad/iPhone, Kobo Books, Nook.

Close to Holmes is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Amazon USABarnes and NobleAmazon UKWaterstones UKAmazon KindleKoboNook  and iBooks for the iPad/iPhone.

Eliminate the Impossible is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Amazon USA, Barnes and Noble, Amazon UK, Waterstones UK, Amazon Kindle, Kobo, Nook and iBooks for the iPad/iPhone.

Evil plans are afoot - SHSL Council Meeting

Thursday will see me and my fellow Council members congregate for the latest Sherlock Holmes Society of London Council meeting. These are held roughly once a quarter. This one is especially important as it is the last before the AGM in about two weeks time.

Here is an image from the last Council meeting*.


I'm on the left*
*kidding


For more information on Arthur Conan Doyle and his time at Undershaw please refer to my book, An Entirely New Country which is available through all good bookstores including Amazon USA, Amazon UK, Classic Specialities, and in all electronic formats including iTunes, Kobo, Nook and Kindle .

The Norwood Author is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Waterstones UK, Amazon UK,  Amazon USA, Barnes and Noble, Amazon Kindle, iBooks for the iPad/iPhone, Kobo Books, Nook.

Close to Holmes is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Amazon USABarnes and NobleAmazon UKWaterstones UKAmazon KindleKoboNook  and iBooks for the iPad/iPhone.

Eliminate the Impossible is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Amazon USA, Barnes and Noble, Amazon UK, Waterstones UK, Amazon Kindle, Kobo, Nook and iBooks for the iPad/iPhone.

Another Tennison Road Update

The Croydon Advertiser have put up more details about the potential future of 12 Tennison Road on their website.

http://www.thisiscroydontoday.co.uk/Sherlock-Holmes-author-Arthur-Conan-Doyle-s-home/story-18685773-detail/story.html#axzz2QW2vAtOc


However what really got me about the article was the statement that:
The imposing property in Tennison Road, South Norwood, was lived in by the Sherlock Holmes author between 1891 and 1894, with residents cherishing his connection with the area.
I'm sorry but I have to take issue with that. Prior to my books Close to Holmes and The Norwood Author there was precious little detail out there about Conan Doyle in South Norwood and nothing that overtly shouted the connection. So to claim the link is cherished by residents is dubious. In fact I suspect that most local residents were (are) ignorant of the connection and if they know it at all they know it through recent press coverage. In South Norwood, prior to 2009, the only physical nods to the Conan Doyle connection were:


  1. Conan Doyle's name on a mosaic tucked under a railway bridge
  2. A road called Doyle Road
  3. A housing block called, if memory serves, Baskerville Court
  4. A special needs school called The Priory School
Of these, numbers 2 and 4 are inferred connections as there is no proof. They could be coincidence.

Aside from the house itself that was pretty much it. Even now, when you exit the station, you see a sign marking the fact that inventor William Stanley lived in South Norwood but nothing about Conan Doyle. The local Wetherspoons pub has a display but only after I lobbied them to erect one. If I hadn't I strongly doubt anyone else would have bothered.

All I can say is grrrrrr.



For more information on Arthur Conan Doyle and his time at Undershaw please refer to my book, An Entirely New Country which is available through all good bookstores including Amazon USA, Amazon UK, Classic Specialities, and in all electronic formats including iTunes, Kobo, Nook and Kindle .

The Norwood Author is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Waterstones UK, Amazon UK,  Amazon USA, Barnes and Noble, Amazon Kindle, iBooks for the iPad/iPhone, Kobo Books, Nook.

Close to Holmes is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Amazon USABarnes and NobleAmazon UKWaterstones UKAmazon KindleKoboNook  and iBooks for the iPad/iPhone.

Eliminate the Impossible is available from all good bookstores, in many formats worldwide including Amazon USA, Barnes and Noble, Amazon UK, Waterstones UK, Amazon Kindle, Kobo, Nook and iBooks for the iPad/iPhone.